#1
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hello i am writting about my son who is 5. he has complex needs. at the moment his sleep patten is up the wall. i am up with him at 3am onwards and he falls back alseep at 630-7. he wont go back in bed as he gets upset. i dont know why he is walking up at this time. he has had accidents but he usually went back to sleep. i am so tied as i have to stay awake untill he has gone asleep. i have 2 other children so its draining me. i dont know what to do. i did put a nappy on him last night and he still woke up but his nappy was bone dry so he had no reason to wake up. any advice would be appriciated thanks
#2
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Sad I bet you're totally exhausted. Am very thankful in that neither of my children have had sleep problems at all, I don't know how I'd handle it. I hope some people have some suggestions for you. x
Julie xx
#3
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I have two children that only sleep for 3-5 hours per night for the last 7 years. YES WE ARE VERY TIRED. Have you considered medication? We have tried everything and at the moment Jessica is on Chloral Hydrate, but we give it to her at around 3am and half the time she will go back to sleep with no bother. My other daughter Nicole gets chloral hydrate and Vallergan together and this seems to work also half the time. But a few nights kip is better than nothing in my eyes.

Also i got this from a website.

If sleep problems persist into childhood and are characterised by an ingrained pattern of not settling, waking repeatedly through the night or waking up too early, then try a routine known as: “SLEEP”.


S.L.E.E.P.


* Settle your child as quickly as possible at a set time into a safe and secure bedroom and wake him or her up at a set time in the morning (use an alarm clock)
*
* Leave your child after settling unless you suspect physical illness or danger
*
* Even if he or she cries out for attention
*
* Even if he or she screams or does anything else to demand your attention
*
* Persist and don’t give in: this will teach your child quickly to get into a healthy sleep pattern and you will notice the benefits for everyone!

No negative effects have been reported following the use of this somewhat dramatic technique and this approach can work very quickly (a few nights). Furthermore, it commonly results in reduced levels of stress for parents and conspicuous improvements in children’s daytime behaviour and capacity to learn.

However, if you are not prepared to ignore your child at night, there is an alternative. You can try to remove your presence from him or her in gradual stages: this involves initially lying on the bed until they fall asleep for a few nights, then by the bed, then near the bedroom door etc. This can be highly effective but usually takes much longer than the technique described above. Ask a trusted friend or Health Visitor to help you with this approach.

A small minority of children will not respond to the techniques described previously for a variety of reasons. In these circumstances it is best to stop, reflect upon why the approach did not work (for example, a parent who eventually “gives in” to their child’s insistent nocturnal demands!) and then to try again when you feel it would be the best time to do so. Some children, and particularly those with visual impairments or other problems like autism, may benefit from taking capsules (2 to 12 milligrams) of a sleep-inducing agent called MELATONIN half an hour before their usual bedtime.

This is a natural hormone that promotes sleep in humans and most other animals. It is effective in about two thirds of patients and is to be preferred to traditional “sleeping pills” such as “Vallergan” and “Phenergan”, that can cause many unwanted problems through side-effects. Melatonin should only be prescribed by doctors who are experienced in its use, such as community paediatricians and child psychiatrists, and only for a fixed period.

Melatonin levels in the body can also be boosted naturally by exposure of the child to daylight in the mornings and also by them eating foods rich in melatonin, or the substance that the body makes it from, shortly before bedtime. These foods include oats, sweet corn, bananas and milk. A banana “smoothie” or a bowl of porridge or corn flakes may just do the trick!

A Child Psychiatrist or Psychologist may also be able to help you with your child’s sleep problems: your GP or Health Visitor can arrange this.

I hope some of this is useful to you, or someone else may be able to suggest something.
HeartHeart Stacy HeartHeart
Mother to Terry 10 MLD + ADHD, Nicole 9 Cri-du-chat Syndrome ADHD Asthma GDD Coarctation, Jessica 4 Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome GDD Reflux
#4
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Just wondering how long this has been on going?

Also in regards to the techniques that are used they alone present problems:

Let me try and explain

* Settle your child as quickly as possible at a set time into a safe and secure bedroom and wake him or her up at a set time in the morning (use an alarm clock) (This is fine)
*
* Leave your child after settling unless you suspect physical illness or danger (This is fine but in cases of medical attention not always possible)
*
* Even if he or she cries out for attention (This can be done if you have one child but if we were to try this in our house for example we would have a 1 year old crying,a 3 year old crying after being woken up by crying both refusing to accept it was time to go back to sleep and then a 7 year old waking up and not going back to sleep because they were also woken,so when there are other Children its a very hard thing to try without the whole house suffering)*
* Even if he or she screams or does anyt
hing else to demand your attention (As above)
*
* Persist and don’t give in: this will teach your child quickly to get into a healthy sleep pattern and you will notice the benefits for everyone! (After a few nights of the same we will collapse and allow the Children back into our bed Big Grin )

I think the other idea though is more suitable and one which brings gradual change and its the way Euan and Emily our eldest have been weened out of our bedroom as Children into there own room and was succesful both times.
We are going to try and embark on this journey again with Alfie soon and ill keep a diary here as well for encouragement for others Smile

Lack of sleep causes so many issues when your lifestyle is hectic as sometimes it can be so tiring knowing you have been up most of the night and then you have appointments in the day and when your driving there they sleep in the car seat and your thinking oh no thats teasing me now......

I dont think there is one size fits all approach but when you are in the situation it can be hard to get out of.

Me personally would recomend a gradual change over if you can go without the sleep intially.

But it may be a part of something else so its maybe worth speaking with a school nurse or doctor if its been on going long term as sometimes its a part of a bigger problem so needs looking.
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#5
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Daniel I know that these issues present problems that's why i put different suggestions, everyone is different and while one thing works for one person it might not work for another.
HeartHeart Stacy HeartHeart
Mother to Terry 10 MLD + ADHD, Nicole 9 Cri-du-chat Syndrome ADHD Asthma GDD Coarctation, Jessica 4 Cri-Du-Chat Syndrome GDD Reflux


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